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Dissertation

Students taking Option A write a dissertation on a topic approved by the HPS Board and prepared under the supervision of a teaching officer or postdoctoral researcher.

The dissertation gives you the chance to explore a topic of interest in depth; it gives you practice in essential writing skills; and it should sharpen your capacity for analysis and posing questions. Part II students in the past have found the dissertation to be the most rewarding aspect of the course. The dissertation counts for 20% of the overall mark – the same as one exam paper.

Dissertation seminars run twice weekly during Lent Term. They give you the opportunity to present your dissertation research and to enjoy constructive feedback.

Dissertation seminars

Length

The dissertation must be between 5,000 and 12,000 words, inclusive of footnotes but excluding bibliography. It is expected to embody a substantial piece of study on a given topic. Quality is not correlated with length, but it is difficult to write a first-class dissertation in 5,000 words.

If you are tempted to exceed the upper limit, remember that the examiners may, if they so choose, stop reading once they reach 12,000 words and give a mark based on their reading up to that point!

Choosing a topic and securing a supervisor

The dissertation must be on a topic that falls within the subject area of history and philosophy of science. Remember, if you have taken the HPS Part IB course, there are many areas covered in Part II that you will not have encountered yet. Remember too that the Department's expertise in some fields is stronger than in others. This is important when it comes to finding an appropriate supervisor.

You should plan to secure a dissertation topic and supervisor as early as possible in Michaelmas Term, and no later than the division of term.

Dissertations are tightly focused pieces of original research. To identify a topic, the first thing to do is to establish the general question and/or area of research that interests you. This will usually correspond to the subject of one of the Part II papers, even if it is not taught directly on that paper. Your Director of Studies can advise about this. Once you have established the general subject area of the dissertation, you should contact the relevant paper manager. He or she will advise you about honing the topic and will put you in contact with an appropriate supervisor.

To get a sense of the sorts of expertise that might be available, and to begin to identify possible supervisors, see the Department's list of dissertation and essay supervisors.

Dissertation and essay supervisors

If you would like to work with an external supervisor – someone who is not a member of the Department – you must obtain permission from the Part II Manager.

Successful dissertation subjects emerge from discussions between students and supervisors, but it is important that you choose a topic you are enthusiastic about. Think about the kind of general questions in HPS that you find significant, and would like to answer. Explore the HPS reading lists. Think about the kind of work you might enjoy doing. Some dissertation topics give the chance for extensive reading and library research; others involve work with instruments in the Whipple Museum; others require a close study of a single text, a critical review of a major debate, or the analysis of an important philosophical problem. The choice is yours.

Please note that a dissertation topic in the same area as a student's primary source essay will not normally be approved.

Planning your work

Once you have secured a topic and a supervisor, your first task will be to start reading. You should aim to have a working bibliography in place by the end of Michaelmas Term. During Lent Term you should establish the focus of the dissertation, and agree a schedule of deadlines for submitting drafts (or draft sections) to your supervisor. Four hours of supervision is the norm for an HPS dissertation. The dissertation is due at the beginning of Easter Term, but you cannot expect your supervisor to be available during the Easter vacation.

Once you have a topic, start the research and writing as soon as possible. It is a mistake to carry out months of research first, with the idea that it will all somehow come together at the very end. Do not leave the writing to take care of itself over the Easter vacation. Do not assume that your first draft will be your final draft: allow plenty of time between the two. You may find it hard to keep up with the weekly routine of supervision essays during term, so the winter vacation is vitally important for writing the dissertation. Have a substantial body of the text in draft when you come up in January so your supervisor has something to read.

Format

Dissertations must include adequate documentation in the form of notes and a bibliography; make sure to check your citations for accuracy, and give precise page numbers and sources for all quotations and illustrations. Various referencing formats are acceptable, but it is essential to be consistent. The Whipple Library has copies of several Part II, Part III and MPhil dissertations that will give examples of reference styles, or you can use an article in a relevant journal as a model. For helpful comments on style and organisation, see the research guide and advice.

Referencing

Submission

You must submit two printed copies of your dissertation by noon on the deadline. Each copy should have a completed cover sheet bound or stapled at the front of it. You should also submit one completed submission form (not attached to either copy). Cover sheets and submission forms will be available on Moodle. The dissertation should be printed single sided.

The dissertation will be marked anonymously, so it is important that your name does not appear anywhere on it.

If you would like to bind your dissertation, you are welcome to use the comb-binding machine in the office for a charge of £1 per copy. Money raised will go towards the end-of-term party.

In addition, you are required to upload your dissertation to the 'HPS Part II Coursework' site on Moodle. Examiners may use this to confirm the word count and check for derivative passages. Please note:

  • The file you upload must be exactly the same as the printed copies. It should include the bibliography and any images.
  • You cannot upload more than one file.
  • The following file formats are accepted: DOC, DOCX, PDF, RTF.

Please note that the Department will retain a copy of your dissertation and may make it available to future students unless you make a written request to the contrary to the Departmental Administrator.

Changing the title

In exceptional circumstances, students sometimes need to change the title of their dissertation after they have they submitted the title form. The deadline for changing the dissertation title is in mid-February.

If you wish to change the title of your dissertation, you should ask for your title form to be returned to you by the Department office. You will need to write the revised title in the 'change of title' box and ask your supervisor and the Part II Manager to sign the form to approve the change. The form should then be returned to the office.

Plagiarism

The University and the Department of History and Philosophy of Science take plagiarism very seriously. Please read our advice about what plagiarism is and how to avoid it.

Plagiarism guidelines

The Department uses the text-matching software Turnitin UK to blanket screen all student work submitted in Moodle.

Use of Turnitin UK