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Department of History and Philosophy of Science

 

The Science Communication Reading Group will examine the intersection between issues in HPS and science communication, looking at themes including the history and sociology of science communication, the recent emergence of the 'science' of science communication, and various moral and ethical issues brought about by the complex relationship between science, scientists and society. Each term we will adopt a particular focus on this broad topic.

Meetings are held on Mondays, 4–5pm on Zoom. Organised by Grace Field (gef30), James Dolan (jad67) and Kanta Dihal (ksd38).

Michaelmas Term 2021: Science Communication in Popular Culture

Week 1 (11 October): Introduction & recap session

  • Lock, S. J. (2011). Deficits and dialogues: Science communication and the public understanding of science in the UK. In D. Bennett & R. C. Jennings (Eds.), Successful science communication: Telling it like it is. Cambridge University Press.
  • [Optional] Introduction, Priest, S. H., Goodwin, J., & Dahlstrom, M. F. (Eds.). (2018). Ethics and practice in science communication. The University of Chicago Press.
  • [Optional] Miller, S. (2008). So Where's the Theory? On the Relationship between Science Communication Practice and Research. In D. Cheng, M. Claessens, T. Gascoigne, J. Metcalfe, B. Schiele, & S. Shi (Eds.), Communicating science in social contexts: New models, new practices. Springer.
  • [Optional] Freeing the Voices: A Science of the People, Irwin, A. (1995). Citizen science: A study of people, expertise, and sustainable development. Routledge.

Week 2 (18 October)

  • Bowler, P. J., & Morus, I. R. (2005). Popular Science. In Making modern science: A historical survey. University of Chicago Press.

Week 3 (25 October)

  • Excerpts from The Tribal Scientist (pp. 18–39) in Goodell, R. (1977). The visible scientists (1st ed). Little, Brown.
  • Carl Sagan – First episode of Cosmos (1980)

Week 4 (1 November)

  • Scientists in popular culture: the making of celebrities, Fahy and Lewenstein. In Bucchi, M., & Trench, B. (Eds.). (2014). Routledge handbook of public communication of science and technology (Second edition). Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Susan Greenfield – Technology & the human mind (2014)

Week 5 (8 November)

  • Before and After Science: Science and Technology in Pop Music, 1970–1990, Bucchi and Lorenzet. In Cheng, D., Claessens, M., Gascoigne, T., Metcalfe, J., Schiele, B., & Shi, S. (Eds.). (2008). Communicating science in social contexts: New models, new practices. Springer.
  • Supplemented by discography referenced in reading.

Week 6 (15 November)

  • Science and technology in film: themes and representations, Kirby. In Bucchi, M., & Trench, B. (Eds.). (2014). Routledge handbook of public communication of science and technology (Second edition). Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Film viewing (title TBD).

Week 7 (22 November)

  • Science communication in fiction, Turney. In Holliman, R. (Ed.). (2009). Practising science communication in the information age: Theorizing professional practices. Oxford University Press.

Week 8 (29 November)

  • Science in Public Culture. In Gregory, J., & Miller, S. (2000). Science in public: Communication, culture, and credibility. Basic Books.