Department of History and Philosophy of Science

Sociology of scientfic knowledge

Martin Kusch

This bibliography includes inter alia: (a) central, or otherwise noteworthy, SSK-literature; (b) a number of historical studies that lean towards SSK; (c) some key resources in the sociology of technology (but only in those areas that are influenced by SSK); (d) important theoretical resources used by writers within SSK. Needless to say, this bibliography is not complete.

  • Main journals (I list journals that publish papers in and on SSK; only the first two are, more or less, exclusively devoted to SSK): Social Studies of Science; Science, Technology, and Human Values; Social Epistemology; Perspectives on Science; Science in Context; Studies in History and Philosophy of Science; Isis; Osiris; British Journal for the History of Science; History of Science; Social Text. Various sociology journals, and philosophy-of-science journals have also carried papers on SSK.
  • Handbook: Jasanoff et al. (1995) attempts to cover all Social Studies of Science and technology.
  • Papers reviewing the whole field: The two outstanding pieces are Shapin (1982), and Shapin (1995; 'Here ...')
  • Introductions: Barnes (1985); Collins & Pinch (1993); Chalmers (1990); Latour (1987); Woolgar (1988); Yearley (1984).
  • Greatest hits (in the category 'monographs and anthologies'): Barnes (1982); Barnes, Bloor & Henry (1996); Bloor (1983), (1991); Collins (1985); Harwood (1983); Knorr-Cetina (1981); Latour and Woolgar (1986); Latour (1987); Lynch (1985, 'Art'); MacKenzie (1981); Nigel & Mulkay (1984); Pickering (1984); Pickering (ed.) (1992); Pinch (1986); Shapin and Schaffer (1985); Shapin (1994); Traweek (1988); Woolgar (ed. 1988).
  • The most influential (or otherwise important) theoretical statements within SSK (I take 'SSK' in a wide sense, here; thus it includes writers like Latour; moreover, I also list here some texts that were written by SSK-advocates on social theory in general, not just on SSK in particular): Ashmore (1985); Barnes (1982), (1983), (1988), (1995); Barnes, Bloor & Henry (1996); Bloor (1982), (1983), (1991), (1997); Collins (1985); Garfinkel, Lynch & Livingston (1981); Latour & Woolgar (1986); Latour (1987), (1993); Law (ed. 1986); Lynch (1993); Pickering (1995); Shapin (1979; 'Homo ...'); Shapin and Schaffer (1985); Shapin (1992), (1994), 1995); Woolgar (ed. 1988).
  • The major historians in SSK: Harwood (1993); MacKenzie (1981), (1990); Pickering (1984); Schaffer; Shapin; Warwick (1992/3).
  • Main laboratory studies: Collins (1974), (1985); Knorr-Cetina (1981); Latour & Woolgar (1986); Lynch (1985, 'Art'); Treweek (1988).
  • Members of the 'Edinburgh School': Bloor, Barnes, Edge, Kusch, MacKenzie, Shapin. Schaffer's work is close; Pickering has rejected some of the key ingredients of the Edinburgh programme.
  • Members of the 'Bath School': Collins, Pinch. Shapin, Schaffer and Pickering all have combined 'Bathian' and 'Edinburghian' themes. The main disagreement between Edinburgh and Bath continues to be the question of 'methodological idealism': see e.g. Collins (1985); Bloor (1996).
  • Proponents and critics of Actor-Network theory: Proponents are first and foremost: Latour, Callon, Law. Pickering (1995) is sympathetic; MacKenzie (1990) is close. For criticism, see e.g. the debate between Collins, Yearley, Latour, and Callon in Pickering (ed. 1992); Brown (1991); Collins & Kusch (1995), (1998); Haraway (1994); Niiniluoto (1991); Schaffer (1991); Shapin (1988).
  • Ethnomethodology: Barnes (1983), (1995); Coulter (1979); Garfinkel (1967); Garfinkel, Lynch & Livingston (1981); Livingston (1986); Lynch (1985, 'Art'), (1993).
  • Discourse analysis: Nigel & Mulkay (1984); Mulkay. The 'reflexive turn': Ashmore (1989); Lynch (1993); Nigel & Mulkay (1984); Shapin (1995, 'Here'); Woolgar (1988), (ed. 1988).
  • The main theoretical resources for SSK-writers (I include here authors that SSK-writers have opposed and criticised; of course different writers within SSK have picked different figures of this list): Ben-David; Crane; Douglas; Durkheim; Feyerabend; Fleck; Foucault; Garfinkel; Hagstrom; Hesse; Kuhn; Lakatos; Mannheim; Merton; Polanyi; Popper; Ravetz; Schütz; Searle; Serres; Wittgenstein.
  • Social/political interests as causes: Barnes (1977); Barnes (1982); Barnes & Shapin (ed. 1979); Barnes, Bloor & Henry (1996); Bloor (1982), (1983), (1991); Forman (1971); Kusch (1995, 'Psychologism') (1999); MacKenzie (1981); Pickering (1984); Shapin (1979), (1982); Shapin & Schaffer (1985).
  • Experiments (work cited here includes some texts that criticise work in SSK, as well as work that must be reckoned with if then one wants to properly assess the work in SSK): Barnes, Bloor & Henry (1996); Collins (1975), (1985), (1988), (1994); Collins & Pinch (1993); Danziger (1990); Farley & Geison (1974); Franklin (1994); Galison (1989); Giere (1988); Gooding (1990); Gooding, Pinch & Schaffer (1989); Hacking (1983); Hull (1988); Jardine (1991); Kusch (1995, 'Recluse'), (1999); Latour (1987); Latour & Woolgar (1986); Lynch (1985, 'Art'); MacKenzie (1988), (1990); Pickering (1984), (1995); Rouse (1987), (1995); Schaffer e.g. (1996); Shapin (1988); Shapin (1994); Shapin & Schaffer (1985).
  • Standardisation, metrology: Fleck (1979); Hogle (1985); Latour (1987), (1988, 'Einstein'), (1993); Law (ed. 1986); MacKenzie (1990); O'Connell (1993); Rouse (1987); Schaffer (1992), (1994, 'Empires'), (1994, 'From'), (1995), (1997); Shapin & Schaffer (1985).
  • Neutrality and symmetry (see also under 'relativism'): Bloor (1991); Collins (1991); Collins (1996) and the other papers in the same issue of Social Studies of Science; Latour (1987); Lynch (1993); Martin (1993); Martin, Richards & Scott (1991); Scott, Richards & Martin (1991).
  • Questions of trust: Blaise (1987); Hardwig (1985), (1991); Shapin (1994), (1995); Woods (1989).
  • Discovery (this includes references to the debate over whether 'discovery by computer' refutes the idea that all knowledge has scientific variables): Bloor (1991), (1997); Brannigan (1981), (1989); Collins (1989); Fuller (1993); Giere (1988), (1989); Langley et al. (1993); Nola (1992); Slezak (1989); Thagard (1993).
  • Work on skill and tacit knowledge: Collins (1974), (1985); Collins & Kusch (1995), (1998); Collins & Pinch (1993); Kuhn (1962); MacKenzie (1990), (1996); MacKenzie & Spinardi (1995); Pinch (1986); Polanyi (1958); Ravetz (1971); Rouse (1987) (1995); Shapin & Schaffer (1985); Turner (1994).
  • Drill and discipline / Foucauldian themes: Collins & Kusch (1998); Foucault (1976), (1979); Kusch (1991), (1995, 'Recluse'); Latour (1987); Law (ed. 1986); Law (ed. 1991); Lynch (1985, 'Discipline'); Pfaffenberger (1992); Schaffer (1988).
  • The main critics from outside SSK (I do not distinguish here between attacks on different writers within SSK): Ben-David (1991); Brown (ed. 1984), (1989), (1991), (1995); Chalmers (1990); Cole (1992); Franklin (1994); Galison (1989); Giere (1988); Gross & Levitt (1994); Gross, Levitt & Lewis (ed. 1996); Haraway (1994); Harding (1991); Hull (1988); Jardine (1991); Kitcher (1993); Laudan in Brown (1984); Laudan (1987), (1990); Lee & Brown (1994); MacIntyre (1980); Newton-Smith (1981); Niiniluoto (1991); Nola (1990), (1992), (1994); Slezak (1989), (1992), (1994); Weinberg (1992); Winner (1993); Wolpert (1992).
  • Starting points for relativism and irrealism: Ashmore (1989); Barnes (1977); Barnes & Bloor (1982); Bloor (1996); Brown (ed. 1984), (1989); Collins (1985); Davidson (1984); Fuller (1988); Biagioli and Schaffer in Galison and Stump (e.g. 1996); Haraway (1991); Hollis & Lukes (eds. 1982); Kitcher (1993); Kusch (1991); Latour (1987), (1989), (1993); Laudan (1990); Lynch (1993); Meiland (1977); Newton-Smith (1981); Niiniluoto (1991); Nola (1992), (1994); Pickering (1995); Shapin (1992); Siegel (1987); Slezak (1989); Winch (1958); Wilson (1970); Wittgenstein (1953); Woolgar (1988), (ed. 1988).
  • Technology studies close to SSK (e.g. SCOT, i.e. 'social construction of technology', and 'actor-network' theory; I also include work on instruments): Bijker, Pinch & Hughes (ed. 1987); Bijker & Law (ed. 1992); Collins (1990); Colins & Kusch (1995), (1998); Haraway (1991); Jasanoff (ed. 1995); Jardine (1991); Johnson (1988); Latour (1987), (1988), (1992), (1993); Law (ed. 1986); MacKenzie (1990), (1996); MacKenzie & Spinardi (1995); MacKenzie & Wajcman (eds. 1985); Pfaffenberger (1992); Pickering (1995); Rouse (1987); Schaffer (1994); Shapin & Schaffer (1985); Traweek (1988).
  • Important historical studies whose authors adopt at least some central ideas or concepts from SSK even though they also distance themselves from SSK: Biagioli (1993); Danziger (1990); Daston & Porter in Megill (1994); Forman (1971); Galison (1989); Gooding (1990); Hull (1988); Rudwick (1985).
  • Social epistemology, sociophilosophy, and other philosophical projects sympathetic to, or informed by, SSK: Ackermann (1985); Fuller (1988), (1989), (1993); Giere (1988); Hacking (1983), (1995); Haraway (1991); Hesse (1988); Jardine (1991); Kusch (1991), (1995, 'Psychologism'), (1997), (1999), (2000); Longino (1990); Rouse (1987), (1995); Stich (1996); Thagard (1993).
  • Sociology of philosophical knowledge: Bloor (1991); Kusch (1995, 'Psychologism'); Kusch (ed. 1998); Shapin & Schaffer (1985).

Literature

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